Poems?, Writing

“Happy” Poetry Isn’t as Easy as It Looks

I used to read love poems quite often when I was in the early stages of becoming a writer. They’re like the introductory section of a textbook. Simple, yet sweet, using basic literary devices in a way that’s easy to comprehend. It’s what everyone writes first. And that, in and of itself, is the problem. Continue reading ““Happy” Poetry Isn’t as Easy as It Looks”

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Editing

Let’s Talk About Revision

By this point in your life, I’m sure you’ve heard people tell you that reading your work out loud is important. Re-read it three times before submitting it. Have someone else read it over; maybe they’ll catch an error you didn’t. As tedious as it all is, there’s an advantage to these suggestions: a solid, well-revised piece of work. But what does that actually look like? Continue reading “Let’s Talk About Revision”

It's a Process

Submitting to Lit Mags and the Anxiousness That Comes With It

“You should be submitting your work.” “Make a name for yourself.” “If you get rejected, at least you tried.” You’ll hear variations of these statements in any writing course you take. Why? Because it’s important. Not everyone is cut out to be a novelist and not everyone wants to be. Literary magazines are the perfect place for shorter pieces of work (poems, essays, creative non-fiction) and you can find a place for any genre you’re into. But no matter who you are, where you submit to, or what you write, you’re always guaranteed one thing: anxiousness. Continue reading “Submitting to Lit Mags and the Anxiousness That Comes With It”

It's a Process

Rejection is Part of the Game

At some point in your writing career, someone somewhere will suggest you submit to literary magazines. You might tell them, “Oh, I’ve got no need for it. I just want to be an author and sit in a cabin by a fireplace and write novels all day.” But you’d be wrong.
Continue reading “Rejection is Part of the Game”

It's a Process

But How Can I Get to Know Them if They’re a Character in a Story?

The answer is simple: you write them a life–not as the background in the story (although, you can include some of it if you want), but as something for you to reference. It’s true that you can have an idea in mind for your character’s personality and actions and start from there, but without knowing who your character actually is, you will have a hard time giving them any sort of depth. Continue reading “But How Can I Get to Know Them if They’re a Character in a Story?”